Theresa Marian Mullin1

F

Children of Theresa Marian Mullin and Michael Burks Callaham

Citations

  1. [S92] Email from Michael Callaham dated May 17, 2008 to Hunter Wayne Bagwell - Subject Line: Marjorie's DAR Application.
  2. [S60] Chip and Pat Collins, "Goff Genealogy (Chip Collins)."

Julie Unknown

F
     Julie Unknown married John Tilmon Bagwell Jr. (III), son of John Tilmon Bagwell II and Marjorie Helen Goff, circa 1992.

Donna Katherine Currier1

F
     Donna Katherine Currier married John Tilmon Bagwell Jr. (III), son of John Tilmon Bagwell II and Marjorie Helen Goff, on 21 March 1998 at Redondo Beach, California.1

Citations

  1. [S60] Chip and Pat Collins, "Goff Genealogy (Chip Collins)."

(?) Unknown

M
     (?) Unknown married Shari Lynn Bagwell, daughter of John Tilmon Bagwell Jr. (III) and Alice Marie Born, circa 1995.

Martha Bradley Smith1,2

F, b. February 1861, d. 1907
Martha Bradley (Smith) Bagwell's Tombstone
(Brashiers Chapel - Marshall County, Alabama)
     Martha Bradley Smith was also known as Martha H. Smith.3 She was born in February 1861 in Alabama (Her tombstone says 1863 as the date of birth).1,4,2,3 Her married name was Bagwell. She married John Cicero Bagwell, son of Reverend John Enoch Bagwell and Eliza Evelyn Williams, in 1885 at Marshall County, Alabama.1,2 Martha Bradley Smith and John Cicero Bagwell lived before 1906 in Shoal Creek community (near Arab), Marshall County, Alabama.2 Martha Bradley Smith died in 1907 in Marshall County, Alabama.3 She was buried at Brashiers Chapel, Arab, Marshall County, Alabama.3

Children of Martha Bradley Smith and John Cicero Bagwell

Citations

  1. [S548] United States Federal Census, Washington, District of Columbia, Population Schedule: Cranford, Marshall, Alabama; Emuneration District: 96, Supervisor District: 7, Sheet: 7B, Dwelling: 8, Family Number: 8, Date: 1900.
  2. [S1059] JoAnne Claire (Bagwell) Hester, "Bagwell (Report)."
  3. [S4644] Martha H. Smith Bagwell Grave Stone, Find a Grave, www.findagrave.com, http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi
  4. [S549] United States Federal Census, Washington, District of Columbia, Population Schedule: Cranford, Marshall, Alabama; Emuneration District: 110, Supervisor District: 7, Sheet: 4A, Dwelling: 62, Family Number: 65, Date: 1910.
  5. [S1050] Email from David Johnson dated November 2009 to JoAnne Claire Bagwell; Subject Line: RE: Homer Virgil Bagwell Family History.

Mattie Jane King

F, b. 30 April 1883, d. 6 September 1955
Mattie Jane (King) Bagwell's Tombstone
Brashiers Chapel - Marshall County, Alabama
     Mattie Jane King was born on 30 April 1883 in Alabama.1,2 As of circa 1900,her married name was Barnard. She married Millard Barnard, son of Francis Barnard, circa 1900.1 Mattie Jane King married John Cicero Bagwell, son of Reverend John Enoch Bagwell and Eliza Evelyn Williams, in 1907 at Marshall County, Alabama.3,4 Her married name was Bagwell. Mattie Jane King died on 6 September 1955 at age 72.1,2 She was buried at Brashiers Chapel, Arab, Marshall County, Alabama.1,2

Children of Mattie Jane King and Millard Barnard

Children of Mattie Jane King and John Cicero Bagwell

Citations

  1. [S591] Wayne Parker Bagwell and Simeon Bradley Bagwell via Interviews with John Enoch Bagwell's Descendents, "Family Group Sheets of John Enoch Bagwell's Descendents."
  2. [S1066] Martha Jane "Mattie" King Barnard Bagwell Grave Stone, Hunter Wayne Bagwell, Indianapolis, Marion County, Indiana, http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi
  3. [S65] Wayne Bagwell, "Wayne Bagwell's Research Materials."
  4. [S549] United States Federal Census, Washington, District of Columbia, Population Schedule: Cranford, Marshall, Alabama; Emuneration District: 110, Supervisor District: 7, Sheet: 4A, Dwelling: 62, Family Number: 65, Date: 1910.
  5. [S1059] JoAnne Claire (Bagwell) Hester, "Bagwell (Report)."
  6. [S1050] Email from David Johnson dated November 2009 to JoAnne Claire Bagwell; Subject Line: RE: Homer Virgil Bagwell Family History.

John Moody Dooly1

M
     John Moody Dooly married Harriett Mintora Bagwell, daughter of Reverend John Enoch Bagwell and Eliza Evelyn Williams, before 1901.1

Citations

  1. [S591] Wayne Parker Bagwell and Simeon Bradley Bagwell via Interviews with John Enoch Bagwell's Descendents, "Family Group Sheets of John Enoch Bagwell's Descendents."

Beny Henry Ellison

M, b. 24 January 1854, d. 24 August 1933
     Beny Henry Ellison was born on 24 January 1854 in South Carolina. He married Harriett Mintora Bagwell, daughter of Reverend John Enoch Bagwell and Eliza Evelyn Williams, before 1930.1 Beny Henry Ellison died on 24 August 1933 in Alabama at age 79.

Citations

  1. [S591] Wayne Parker Bagwell and Simeon Bradley Bagwell via Interviews with John Enoch Bagwell's Descendents, "Family Group Sheets of John Enoch Bagwell's Descendents."

Seldon G. Fowler

M, b. 20 April 1869, d. 4 October 1902
     Seldon G. Fowler was born on 20 April 1869 in Blount County, Alabama. He married Harriett Mintora Bagwell, daughter of Reverend John Enoch Bagwell and Eliza Evelyn Williams, in 1891 at Blount County, Alabama.1 Seldon G. Fowler died on 4 October 1902 in Blount County, Alabama, at age 33.

Children of Seldon G. Fowler and Harriett Mintora Bagwell

Citations

  1. [S591] Wayne Parker Bagwell and Simeon Bradley Bagwell via Interviews with John Enoch Bagwell's Descendents, "Family Group Sheets of John Enoch Bagwell's Descendents."

Marcus Lafayette Cox1

M, b. 3 July 1875, d. 13 June 1921
     Marcus Lafayette Cox was born on 3 July 1875 in South Carolina.1,2 He married Florence Savannah Bagwell, daughter of Reverend John Enoch Bagwell and Eliza Evelyn Williams, circa 1897.3,1 Marcus Lafayette Cox died on 13 June 1921 in Marshall County, Alabama, at age 45.2 He was buried at Brashiers Chapel Cemetery, Arab, Marshall County, Alabama.2

Children of Marcus Lafayette Cox and Florence Savannah Bagwell

Citations

  1. [S542] United States Federal Census, Washington, District of Columbia, Population Schedule: Warrenton, Marshall, Alabama; Emuneration District: 91, Supervisor District: 7, Sheet: 1A, Dwelling: 7, Family Number: 7, Date: 1900.
  2. [S3536] Marcus Lafayette Cox Grave Stone, unknown repository, unknown repository address, http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi
  3. [S65] Wayne Bagwell, "Wayne Bagwell's Research Materials."

Martha E. A. Blackstock1

F, b. 8 August 1841, d. 22 April 1908
     Martha E. A. Blackstock was born on 8 August 1841 in Georgia.1,2 She was the daughter of (?) Blackstock. As of 14 May 1858,her married name was Bagwell. Martha E. A. Blackstock married William Bagwell, son of Henson Bagwell and Lavissa Clark, on 14 May 1858.3,2 Martha E. A. Blackstock died on 22 April 1908 at age 66.

Children of Martha E. A. Blackstock and William Bagwell

Citations

  1. [S1544] United States Federal Census, Washington, District of Columbia, Population Schedule: Wilsons, Hall, Georgia; Enumeration District: 136; Supervisor District: 1; Page: 97A, Dwelling: 77, Family Number: 79, Date: 1880.
  2. [S1546] United States Federal Census, Washington, District of Columbia, Population Schedule: Goodwin, Gwinnett, Georgia; Page: 3A, Dwelling: 220, Family Number: 224, Date: 1870.
  3. [S35] Pamela Murrell Bagwell, BAGWELL, THE FAMILY HISTORY BOOK, A GENEALOGICAL RECORD.

George Alexander Bagwell1,2,3

M, b. 8 March 1878, d. 27 June 1959
     George Alexander Bagwell was born on 8 March 1878 in Forsyth County, Georgia.4,1 He was the son of William Blassingame Bagwell and Amanda Isabell Brashears. George Alexander Bagwell married Loucinda (Lucinda) Boyles circa 1898 at Georgia.1 George Alexander Bagwell died on 27 June 1959 in Gwinnett County, Georgia, at age 81.2 He was buried at Sugar Hill Cemetery, Gwinnett County, Georgia.

Children of George Alexander Bagwell and Loucinda (Lucinda) Boyles

Citations

  1. [S103] 1910 United States Federal Census, Washington, District of Columbia, Population Schedule: Big Creek, Forsyth, Georgia; Page: 1B; Enumeration District: 36; Image: 566, Date: April 23, 1910.
  2. [S104] George Alexander Bagwell, Death Certificate: George Alexander Bagwell.
  3. [S105] 1900 United States Federal Census, Washington, District of Columbia, Population Schedule: Big Creek, Forsyth, Georgia; Page: 6A; Enumeration District: 30., Date: June 8, 1900.
  4. [S102] 1880 United States Federal Census, Washington, District of Columbia, Population Schedule: Big Creek, Forsyth, Georgia; Page: 410.3000; Enumeration District: 76; Image: 0101., Date: June 10, 1880.

Francis Bagwell

F, b. 24 October 1819
     Francis Bagwell was born on 24 October 1819 in Shelby County, Alabama. She was the daughter of Fredrick Bagwell and Margaret Ann (Peggy) Crawford.

Terry H. Bagwell1

M, b. 23 May 1821, d. 16 February 1870
     Terry H. Bagwell was born on 23 May 1821 in Shelby County, Alabama.1 He was the son of Fredrick Bagwell and Margaret Ann (Peggy) Crawford. Terry H. Bagwell married Louisa Earnest Morrison in 1840. Regiment Name: 15 Mississippi Infantry
Side: Confederate
Company I
Soldier's Rank_In Private
Soldier's Rank_Out Private
Film Number M232 roll 2.2 Terry H. Bagwell died on 16 February 1870 at age 48.1 He was buried at Shiloh Methodist Cemetery, Choctaw County, Mississippi.1

Children of Terry H. Bagwell and Louisa Earnest Morrison

Citations

  1. [S240] Terry H Bagwell Grave Stone, Find a Grave, www.findagrave.com, http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi
  2. [S359] Civil War Soldiers and Sailors System: Terry H. Bagwell, online http://www.itd.nps.gov/cwss/

Henry B. Bagwell1,2,3

M, b. 16 March 1823, d. 25 April 1862
Confederate Mound at Crown Hill Cemetery at Indianapolis, Indiana
     Henry B. Bagwell was born on 16 March 1823 in Shelby County, Alabama.1,2,3 He was the son of Fredrick Bagwell and Margaret Ann (Peggy) Crawford. Henry B. Bagwell married Angeline Thompson circa 1845 at Mississippi.2,3 Henry B. Bagwell was Henry B. a farmer in 1860 at Township 17, Choctaw County, Mississippi.2 He and Angeline Thompson lived in 1860 in Township 17, Choctaw County, Mississippi.2 Enlisted as a private in the 4th Mississippi Infantry, Company A in September 1861 in Grenada County, Mississippi. Company A was called the Bankston Guards and drew enlistees from Choctaw County, Mississippi.

The 4th Infantry was among the troops posted at Fort Henry on the Tennessee River, under General Lloyd Tilghman (CSA), when General Grant's (US Army) land and river expedition approached in February, 1862. After the naval attack by Union forces, the Confederates were compelled to the surrender Fort Henry on February 6, 1862. The 4th Infantry Mississippi retreated to Fort Donelson where the fighting continued and the surrender of Fort Donelson followed. Many of the 4th Mississippi Infantry became prisoners of war. Henry B. was taken to Fort Morton, a POW camp, in Indianapolis, Indiana where he died along with 1,600+ confederate soldiers. The confederate soldiers were buried in Green Lawn Cemetery in Indianapolis, Indiana. In subsequent years, erosion by the White River and commercialization forced the closing of the cemetery and relocation of all the graves, including the Confederate soldiers. Some of the dead were shipped home, some were relocated to Crown Hill Cemetery (Section 32 - Lot 285) in Indianapolis, Indiana and buried in a mass grave. A plague in Crown Hill Cemetery denotes the soldiers that died at Camp Morton. One of the Confederate soldiers listed is H.B. Bagwell serving in Company A, 4th Infantry Mississippi. It is unknown whether Henry B. was relocated to Crown Hill Cemetery or sent home to Mississippi for burial.

A grave exists in Shiloh Cemetery in Choctaw County, Mississippi for Henry H. Bagwell with the same birth and death dates. it is assumed that he was transferred home from Indianapolis, Indiana or the tombstone in Shiloh Cemetery is a placemarker.4,5,6 He died on 25 April 1862 in Camp Morton (POW) Camp, Indianapolis, Marion County, Indiana, at age 39. It is assumed Henry B. was buried at Shiloh Methodist Cemetery, Choctaw County, Mississippi.1

Children of Henry B. Bagwell and Angeline Thompson

Citations

  1. [S236] Henry H Bagwell Grave Stone, Find a Grave, www.findagrave.com.
  2. [S356] United States Federal Census, Washington, District of Columbia, Population Schedule: Township 17, Choctaw, Mississippi, Page: 35, Dwelling: 366, Family Number: 354, Date: 1860.
  3. [S358] United States Federal Census, Washington, District of Columbia, Population Schedule: Subdivision 23, Choctaw, Mississippi, Page: 58 or 140 (both entries on page), Dwelling: 410, Family Number: 410, Date: 1850.
  4. [S361] Camp Morton – Civil War Camp and Union Prison, online http://freepages.history.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~indiana42nd/…
  5. [S362] 4th Mississippi Infantry, online http://www.mississippiscv.org/MS_Units/4th_MS_INF.htm
  6. [S363] "American Civil War Soldiers: H(enry) Bagwell."

Jane Caroline Bagwell1

F, b. 16 March 1825, d. 7 June 1857
     Jane Caroline Bagwell was born on 16 March 1825 in Shelby County, Alabama.1,2 She was the daughter of Fredrick Bagwell and Margaret Ann (Peggy) Crawford.1 As of 1849,her married name was Savage. Jane Caroline Bagwell married James Anderson Savage, son of John S. Savage and Ann H. Gillespie, in 1849 at Choctaw County, Mississippi.1,2 Jane Caroline Bagwell died on 7 June 1857 in Choctaw County, Mississippi, at age 32.2 She was buried at Bethlehem Cemetery, Ackerman, Choctaw County, Mississippi.2

Children of Jane Caroline Bagwell and James Anderson Savage

Citations

  1. [S69] LDS Submission - by Sheryl Bagwell.
  2. [S1183] Jane Caroline Bagwell Savage Grave Stone, Find a Grave, www.findagrave.com.

Christine (Christiana) Bagwell

F, b. 9 December 1826, d. 13 March 1892
     Christine (Christiana) Bagwell was also known as Christiana Bagwell. She was born on 9 December 1826 in Shelby County, Alabama. She was the daughter of Fredrick Bagwell and Margaret Ann (Peggy) Crawford. As of 1845,her married name was Sharp. Christine (Christiana) Bagwell married John Washington Sharp in 1845 at Choctaw County, Mississippi. Christine (Christiana) Bagwell died on 13 March 1892 in Sturgis, Choctaw County, Mississippi, at age 65.

Child of Christine (Christiana) Bagwell and John Washington Sharp

John Washington Sharp

M, b. 22 January 1825, d. 19 August 1903
     John Washington Sharp was born on 22 January 1825 in Alabama. He married Christine (Christiana) Bagwell, daughter of Fredrick Bagwell and Margaret Ann (Peggy) Crawford, in 1845 at Choctaw County, Mississippi. John Washington Sharp died on 19 August 1903 in Sturgis, Oktibbeha County, Mississippi, at age 78.

Child of John Washington Sharp and Christine (Christiana) Bagwell

James William Bagwell1,2,3

M, b. 17 August 1828, d. 4 December 1911
     James William Bagwell was born on 17 August 1828 in Shelby County, Alabama.1,2 He was the son of Fredrick Bagwell and Margaret Ann (Peggy) Crawford.2 James William Bagwell married Jane Palina Ivy on 12 November 1850 at Winston County, Mississippi. Private, C Cty "K", 15th MS Infantry, "Choctaw Grays." James William Bagwell died on 4 December 1911 in Winston City, Mississippi, at age 83.1 He was buried at Murphy Creek Baptist Church Cemetery, Winston County, Mississippi.1

Children of James William Bagwell and Jane Palina Ivy

Citations

  1. [S242] James William Bagwell Grave Stone, Find a Grave, www.findagrave.com.
  2. [S357] United States Federal Census, Washington, District of Columbia, Population Schedule: Subdivision 23, Choctaw, Mississippi, Page: 58 or 140 (both entries on page), Dwelling: 409, Family Number: 409, Date: 1850.
  3. [S369] United States Federal Census, Washington, District of Columbia, Population Schedule: Oktibbeha, Mississippi, Page: 123, Dwelling: 957, Family Number: 819, Date: 1860.

Ann Bagwell

F, b. 29 March 1830
     Her married name was Hawkins. Ann Bagwell was born on 29 March 1830 in Shelby County, Alabama. She was the daughter of Fredrick Bagwell and Margaret Ann (Peggy) Crawford. Ann Bagwell married William P. Hawkins in 1842 at Choctaw County, Mississippi.

John Leander Bagwell1,2

M, b. 3 January 1832, d. 29 September 1908
     John Leander Bagwell was born on 3 January 1832 in Shelby County, Alabama.1,2,3,4,5 He was the son of Fredrick Bagwell and Margaret Ann (Peggy) Crawford.2 John Leander Bagwell married Sarah Frances Elizabeth Turner, daughter of Franklin Turner and Keziah McClanahan, on 27 April 1858 at Choctaw County, Mississippi.5 Was a private in the Confederate States Army during the Civil War.3 Company I under R.G. Prewitt, in the 15th Mississippi Infantry. This unit was part of the Choctaw Guards/Rangers. His Company was involved with battles at Vicksburg, Peachtree Creek, Atlanta, Nashville, and Franklin. John Leander Bagwell married Julia F. Moss, daughter of Rosa (?), on 30 November 1905 at Choctaw County, Mississippi.5 John Leander Bagwell died on 29 September 1908 in Choctaw County, Mississippi, at age 76.1,3,4 He was buried at Shiloh Methodist Cemetery, Choctaw County, Mississippi. There is also evidence that John Leander is buried at Bethlehem Cemetery, Ackerman, Choctaw County, Mississippi.1,3,4

Children of John Leander Bagwell and Sarah Frances Elizabeth Turner

Citations

  1. [S237] John Leander Bagwell Grave Stone, Find a Grave, www.findagrave.com, http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi
  2. [S357] United States Federal Census, Washington, District of Columbia, Population Schedule: Subdivision 23, Choctaw, Mississippi, Page: 58 or 140 (both entries on page), Dwelling: 409, Family Number: 409, Date: 1850.
  3. [S368] John Leander Bagwell Grave Stone, Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah.
  4. [S642] John Bagwell Grave Stone, Find a Grave, www.findagrave.com.
  5. [S1368] Email from e-mail address dated 7/17/2010 to e-mail address; Subject Line: Atlas Stanton Bagwell Descendents.
  6. [S1171] Marcus E. Bagwell Grave Stone, Find a Grave, www.findagrave.com.

Peter Crawford Bagwell1,2

M, b. 15 October 1834, d. 8 July 1869
     Peter Crawford Bagwell was also known as Crawford Bagwell. He was born on 15 October 1834 in Shelby County, Alabama.1,2 He was the son of Fredrick Bagwell and Margaret Ann (Peggy) Crawford.2 Peter Crawford Bagwell married Malissa Johnston on 22 January 1857 at Winston County, Mississippi. Peter Crawford Bagwell died on 8 July 1869 at age 34.1 He was buried at Shiloh Methodist Cemetery, Choctaw County, Mississippi.1

Children of Peter Crawford Bagwell and Malissa Johnston

Citations

  1. [S239] Peter Crawford Bagwell Grave Stone, Find a Grave, www.findagrave.com.
  2. [S357] United States Federal Census, Washington, District of Columbia, Population Schedule: Subdivision 23, Choctaw, Mississippi, Page: 58 or 140 (both entries on page), Dwelling: 409, Family Number: 409, Date: 1850.

Mary Elizabeth Bagwell1

F, b. 27 August 1836, d. 26 September 1898
     Her married name was Jackson. Mary Elizabeth Bagwell was born on 27 August 1836 in Choctaw County, Mississippi.1 She was the daughter of Fredrick Bagwell and Margaret Ann (Peggy) Crawford.1 Mary Elizabeth Bagwell married William Jacob Jackson in 1854 at Choctaw County, Mississippi. Mary Elizabeth Bagwell died on 26 September 1898 in Ackerman, Choctaw County, Mississippi, at age 62.

Citations

  1. [S357] United States Federal Census, Washington, District of Columbia, Population Schedule: Subdivision 23, Choctaw, Mississippi, Page: 58 or 140 (both entries on page), Dwelling: 409, Family Number: 409, Date: 1850.

William Asberry "Billy" Bagwell1,2,3

M, b. 3 March 1839, d. 10 January 1913
William Asberry Bagwell (Left) Martin Van Buren Bagwell (Right)
Both men served in Company I, 15th Mississippi Infantry Regiment, CSA Army
Photograph courtesy of Michael Brent
     William Asberry "Billy" Bagwell was born on 3 March 1839 in Choctaw County, Mississippi.1,2,3 He was the son of Fredrick Bagwell and Margaret Ann (Peggy) Crawford.2 William Asberry "Billy" Bagwell married Sarah Elizabeth Box in May 1860 at Choctaw County, Mississippi.3 Military Service: Private, Company I, 15th Mississippi Infantry, CSA, War for Southern Independence. William Asberry "Billy" Bagwell died on 10 January 1913 in Memphis, Shelby County, Tennessee, at age 73.1 He was buried at Shiloh Methodist Cemetery, Choctaw County, Mississippi.1

Children of William Asberry "Billy" Bagwell and Sarah Elizabeth Box

Citations

  1. [S241] William Asberry Bagwell Grave Stone, Find a Grave, www.findagrave.com.
  2. [S357] United States Federal Census, Washington, District of Columbia, Population Schedule: Subdivision 23, Choctaw, Mississippi, Page: 58 or 140 (both entries on page), Dwelling: 409, Family Number: 409, Date: 1850.
  3. [S367] United States Federal Census, Washington, District of Columbia, Population Schedule: Choctaw, Mississippi;, Enumeration District: 37; Supervisor District: 1; Page: 44, Dwelling: 396, Family Number: 396, Date: 1880.

Martin Van Buren Bagwell1,2,3

M, b. 23 November 1840, d. 1 August 1915
William Asberry Bagwell (Left) Martin Van Buren Bagwell (Right)
Both men served in Company I, 15th Mississippi Infantry Regiment, CSA Army
Photograph courtesy of Michael Brent
     Martin Van Buren Bagwell was born on 23 November 1840 in Choctaw County, Mississippi.1,2,3 He was the son of Fredrick Bagwell and Margaret Ann (Peggy) Crawford.2 Martin Van Buren enlisted as a Private in Company I, 15th Mississippi Infantry regiment.

The regiment was organized at Corinth from the companies ordered by Governor Pettus to assemble there May 21, 1861. Soon after their arrival they were mustered into the Confederate States service for twelve months and field officers were elected June 6, 1861, Statham, Hemphill and Dennis. With the Fourteenth, organized under the same circumstances, the Fifteenth was ordered to Union City, Tenn., and thence, August 13, to Russellville, for duty with General Zollicoffer. At Knoxville, September 12, the Fourteenth was ordered to Cumberland Gap. October 16, Colonel Statham, with 600 of his regiment received orders for a march to Barboursville. On this expedition, with other regiments of the command, the Fifteenth skirmished with Schoepf's Union Brigade at Camp Wildcat, on Rockcastle hills October 21, Schoepf reporting a loss of 4 killed, 20 wounded; Zollicoffer 11 killed, 42 wounded.
Returning to Cumberland Gap with a wagon train loaded with salt, they made another advance into Kentucky November 7, and on the 14th Statham was ordered to occupy Wartburg and intrench. They went into winter quarters.
The Fifteenth was returned November 20, 1861, 1,051 present and absent, 553 present for duty; in December, at Beech Grove Ky., 854 present for duty.
Being approached by a Federal command under Gen. George H. Thomas, General Crittenden advanced on January 19th, Zollicoffer's Brigade led by the Fifteenth under Lieutenant-Colonel Walthall. General Crittenden, in his report of the battle of Fishing Creek, describing the fall of Zollicoffer and the confusion that followed, wrote: "For an hour now the Fifteenth Mississippi, under Lieutenant-Colonel Walthall and the Twentieth Tennessee, under Col. Joel Battle, had been struggling with the superior force of the enemy. I cannot omit to mention the heroic valor of these two regiments, officers and men. When the left retired they were flanked and compelled to leave their position." The Sixteenth Alabama went to their support, but the remainder of the little army was breaking into rout. Many of the men were armed with flintlock muskets. "The regiment was most gallantly led by Walthall," said Crittenden. "The reputation of the Mississippians for heroism was fully sustained by this regiment. It's loss in killed and wounded, which was far greater than that of any other regiment, tells sufficiently the story of discipline and courage. The limits of this report will not permit me to enumerate the individual acts of courage with which this regiment abounded. Suffice it to say that it is entitled to all praise." The regiment had 44 killed and 153 wounded; a record that has few parallels in any battle. Doubtless its heroic self-sacrifice saved the main part of the Confederate command from capture. the return also showed 29 missing, probably captured and partly wounded. the Fifteenth and Twentieth Tennessee fell back to the intrenchments on the Cumberland River, and after the troops had all crossed a detail of the Fifteenth burned the steamer that was used as a ferry.
In the reorganization of Johnston's forces February 23, Colonel Statham was assigned to command of the Zollicoffer Brigade, including the Fifteenth under Major Brantley, and the Twenty-second.
Statham's Brigade was part of Breckenridge's "reserve corps" in the organization before the battle of Shiloh, and in that battle fought under his immediate command, participating in the capture of Prentiss' Division, and at the close of the first day were on the front line, occupying the heights overlooking the Tennessee River, under fire of the gunboats.
There was a reorganization in May, and re-enlistment for two years. Lieutenant-Colonel Walthall organized the Twenty-ninth Regiment, and became its commander.
The brigade, under command of Colonel Statham, composed of the Fifteenth, under Lieutenant-Colonel Farrell, and Twenty-second Mississippi, with four Tennessee regiments, served in support of Vicksburg, with the forces under General VanDorn, during the naval bombardment of June and July, 1862. While on this service Colonel Statham died. (Rietti's Annals) The Fifteenth was posted on the present site of the National Cemetery, July 15, 1862, the day that the battleship Arkansas came down the Yazoo and ran through the Federal fleet above Vicksburg, and witnessed that memorable scene. (L.P. Carr.) Following is the return of the Fifteenth in the Fourth Brigade, "Breckenridge's Division, Army of the Mississippi, Vicksburg, July 20, 1862:" Col. W.S. Statham; Lieutenant-Colonel, M. Farrell; Major, J.R. Binford; Adjutant, J.A. Binford Jr; Acting Quartermaster, B.J. Dudley; Acting Commissary, Lieutenant G.F. Crawford; Assistant Surgeon, Dr. Fleming.
The brigade formed part of the force taken to Louisiana by General Breckenridge, which made the attack on Baton Rouge, August 5, 1862. They were part of General Clark's Division; the brigade under command of Colonel T.B. Smith, of Tennessee, the Fifteenth commanded by Major Binford. "This admirable regiment, much reduced by long and gallant services, was held as a reserve, "General Breckenridge reported. After this they were on duty at Port Hudson, until ordered to Jackson, Miss.
The Fifteenth (Colonel Farrell), Twenty-second and Fifth Mississippi, First Missouri, and Caruther's Battalion, formed the brigade of Gen. John S. Bowen, in Lovell's Division, VanDorn's Army of West Tennessee. VanDorn marched to Davis' Mill, twenty miles from Grand Junction, Tenn., and toward Bolivar, while General Price was advancing to Iuka, where he fought the battle of September 19, after which VanDorn fell back and was joined by Price at Ripley, whence they marched to Pocahontas, threatening the Federal post at Bolivar, and turning suddenly, crossed the Hatchie and Tuscumia and attempted to surprise and take the fortifications at Corinth held by General Rosecrans. The brigade first formed line of battle east of Cypress Creek, October 3, the Fifteenth and Twenty-second forming the main line, the First Missouri and Caruther's Battalion on the skirmish line. With this formation the advanced steadily against the outer line of works, capturing the battery at the salient near the railroad, and driving the Federal infantry from the trenches. On the 4th the brigade advanced to within 600 yards of a strong line of redoubts, skirmished to develop the strength of the position, and were swept by such a destructive artillery fire that Bowen retired to a short distance and finally was ordered to the rear. Bowen's Brigade was the rear-guard of infantry on the retreat and the Fifteenth sustained the main attack at the Tuscumbia River bridge, which the regiment met coolly and repulsed. The brigade casualties were 28 killed, 92 wounded, 40 missing. They retreated to Ripley and Holly Springs. When Grant advanced from Memphis along the Central Railroad in December, the Fifteenth fell back to Grenada, and was in the fight at Coffeeville, December 5. At Grenada in January, 1863, the regiment was included in Rust's Brigade, Loring's Division. The brigade was ordered from Jackson to the Big Black River, February 9, and from Edwards to Port Hudson, February 22, and back to Jackson April 6. Company C, Captain P.H. Norton, had remained at Jackson, with Gen John Adams. Were ordered to Tullahoma, Tenn., April 13, which order was countermanded as soon as the Federal boats ran the batteries at Vicksburg, April 16. Rust's Brigade was ordered consolidated with Tilghman's Brigade April 15. April 24, Adams was ordered to move the Fifteenth and Twenty-sixth from Jackson to Morton, at the time of Grierson's raid. The regiment at the time of this movement was 517 strong. April 29, Tilghman, at Jackson was ordered to take the Fifteenth, Col. Farrell, and Twenty-sixth, and a field battery, to the Big Black, and take command of troops there. The Fifteenth is not named, however, in the reports of Tilghman's Brigade at the battle of Baker's Creek. In July, Gen. John Adams' Brigade included the Sixth, Fourteenth, Fifteenth, Twentieth, Twenty-third, Twenty-sixth Mississippi and Forney's Battalion. The brigade joined in the advance of Johnston's army to the Big Black near the close of the siege of Vicksburg, falling back to Jackson when Vicksburg surrendered, and at Jackson besieged by Sherman July 9-16, then retreating to Morton. Loring's Division was at Canton when Sherman began his march to Meridian from Vicksburg, in February, 1864, moved to Morton and retired to Demopolis, Ala., under the order of General Polk.
The brigade, under Gen. John Adams, served through the Atlanta campaign from the time of its arrival at Resaca, May 11, 1864, occupying intrenched lines there and on the Dalton and Kenesaw Mountain lines, was engaged on Peachtree Creek, and in the battle of July 28 near Atlanta, and in the trenches around the city until the evacuation, September 1. General Polk was killed at Pine Mountain, after which the Army of the Mississippi was known as A.P. Stewart's Corps, Army of Tennessee. The returns show Col. Michael Farrell in command of the regiment through the campaign.
July 19, at Moor's Mill, on Peachtree Creek, the regiment participated in the attack of Reynold's Brigade upon the Federal advance. General Adams claimed that the regiment received the surrender of a Federal regiment, which, however, escaped. General Reynolds reported that a considerable number of prisoners were taken and that "the Fifteenth Mississippi acted gallantly when brought into action." The casualties of the regiment, May 12 to July 26, 17 killed, 80 wounded. Adjutant Mitchell was badly wounded; Lieutenant Hugh Montgomery was missing, supposed killed. Of this loss, a considerable part was in the battles of Resaca, May 13-15, and New Hope Church, May 27.
In the October, 1864, campaign on the Chattanooga and Atlanta Railroad, Loring's Division, including Adams' Brigade, captured the garrison at Actworth, October 4, an affair in which the Fifteenth had a prominent part; marched as far north as Dalton, thence through the mountains to Gadsden; made a demonstration against Decatur, and moved to Tuscumbia.
Crossing the river November 20, they marched with Stewart's Corps to Columbia and on November 29, joined in the flank movement to Spring Hill. Following closely upon the Federal retreat from Columbia to Spring Hill, they were heroic participants in the bloody assault of the evening of November 30. general Adams was killed while leading his men against the second line of works, his horse falling across the parapet. Col. Robert Lowry, who succeeded to brigade command, reported that the flag of the fifteenth regiment was lost, four men having been shot down in bearing it forward to the works. Colonel Farrell, a brilliant officer, was mortally wounded, and Lieut.-Col. Binford took command of the regiment. Lieutenants Young and Allen were killed; Lieuts. Shuler, Irish, Campell, Hale, Tribble, wounded. The casualties of the brigade were 44 killed, 271 wounded, 23 missing. The effective strength of the brigade after the advance to Nashville was a little over 1,000, including six regiments. The position of Stewart's Corps in front of Nashville was distinguished for steadiness in forming a new line to check the enemy and on the next day they repelled all assaults until the line broke over their left. In the last days of December they recrossed the Tennessee River and early in January the corps went into camp near Tupelo.
About the first of February, 1865, the remnant of Loring's Division began the movement to the Carolinas. February 25, they were ordered forward from Augusta, Ga., to Newberry, S.C. In the campaign under Gen. J.E. Johnston against General Sherman the division took part in the battles of Kingston, March 10, and Bentonville, March 19-21. In the latter battle the division was distinguished by a gallant and successful charge.
Organization of army of Gen. J.E. Johnston, near Smithville, N.C., March 31, 1865, shows Maj.-Gen. Walthall in command of Stewart's Corps, Adams' Brigade, commanded by Col. Richard Harrison, the Fifteenth Regiment by Lieut. E. Love. April 9, the brigade, including an Alabama and a Louisiana regiment, under the command of Brig.-Gen. Robert Lowry. The Sixth, Fifteenth, Twentieth and Twenty-third Mississippi Regiments were consolidated as the Fifteenth, Lieut.-Col. Thomas B. Graham commanding.
Hostilities were suspended April 18, the army was surrendered April 26 at Durham Station, and paroled at Greensboro.4,5 Martin Van Buren aas a Confederate Soldier in the Civil War. He was a private in Co. I, 15th Regiment, Mississippi Volunteers. He enlisted at Corinth, Mississippi on May 29 1861, by J. W. Hemphill. He traveled 210 miles to place of rendevous. He was taken captive at Citronelle, Alabama on May 4 1865. He was with a detachment of men that were surrendered by Gen. R. Taylor, C.S.A., to Maj. Gen E.R.S.Canby, U.S.A. He was paroled at Meridian, Mississippi on May 9, 1865. He was in the Civil War with one of his Cousins with the last name of Crawford. This Crawford was married to Mary (Mollie) Ann Quinn. Crawford was killed in the Civil War, and Martin V Bagwell brought Crawfords things back to Mollie. They began a courtship, and were married.6 He married Mary Ann "Mollie" Quinn on 25 September 1865 at Oktibbeha County, Mississippi.3 Martin Van Buren Bagwell died on 1 August 1915 in New Albany, Union County, Mississippi, at age 74
MILITARY: Was a Confederate Soldier in the Civil War. He was a private in Co. I, 15th Regiment, Mississippi Volunteers. He enlisted at Corinth, Mississippi on May 29 1861, by J. W. Hemphill. He traveled 210 miles to place of rendevous. He was taken captive at Citronelle, Alabama on May 4 1865. He was with a detachment of men that were surrendered by Gen. R. Taylor, C.S.A., to Maj. Gen E.R.S.Canby, U.S.A. He was paroled at Meridian, Mississippi on May 9, 1865. He was in the Civil War with one of his Cousins with the last name of Crawford. This Crawford was married to Mary (Mollie) Ann Quinn. Crawford was killed in the Civil War, and Martin V Bagwell brought Crawfords things back to Mollie. They began a courtship, and were married.1
He was buried at Glenfield Cemetery, New Albany, Union County, Mississippi.6

Children of Martin Van Buren Bagwell and Mary Ann "Mollie" Quinn

Citations

  1. [S238] Martin Van Buren Bagwell Grave Stone, Find a Grave, www.findagrave.com.
  2. [S357] United States Federal Census, Washington, District of Columbia, Population Schedule: Subdivision 23, Choctaw, Mississippi, Page: 58 or 140 (both entries on page), Dwelling: 409, Family Number: 409, Date: 1850.
  3. [S461] United States Federal Census, Washington, District of Columbia, Population Schedule: Township 6 Range 3, Tippah, Mississippi, Page: 13, Dwelling: 93, Family Number: 93, Date: 1870.
  4. [S360] Civil War Soldiers and Sailors System: Martin V. Bagwell, online http://www.itd.nps.gov/cwss/
  5. [S460] Choctaw Greys - 15th Mississippi Infantry, online http://www.choctawgrays.com/
  6. [S1881] Martin VanBuren Bagwell Grave Stone, Find a Grave, www.findagrave.com, http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi

Sallie E. Bagwell

F, b. 1844
     Sallie E. Bagwell was born in 1844 in Mississippi. She was the daughter of Fredrick Bagwell and Margaret Ann (Peggy) Crawford.

William Jacob Jackson

M
     William Jacob Jackson married Mary Elizabeth Bagwell, daughter of Fredrick Bagwell and Margaret Ann (Peggy) Crawford, in 1854 at Choctaw County, Mississippi.

Florida Angelyn Bagwell1

F, b. 25 November 1877, d. 2 January 1961
     Florida Angelyn Bagwell was born on 25 November 1877 in Georgia.1 She was the daughter of John Elijah Bagwell and Mary Anna Priest.1 Her married name was Scales. Florida Angelyn Bagwell married Clarence Elba Wilson Scales. Florida Angelyn Bagwell lived in 1920 in Brooks County, Georgia; Had 8 children when they moved. She died on 2 January 1961 at age 83.

Children of Florida Angelyn Bagwell and Clarence Elba Wilson Scales

Citations

  1. [S667] United States Federal Census, Washington, District of Columbia, Population Schedule: Morgan, Hall, Georgia; Enumeration District: 134; Supervior District: 1; Page: 21, Dwelling: 199, Family Number: 199, Date: 1880.
  2. [S2269] Email from Lynn Smith dated August 2012 to Hunter Wayne Bagwell; Subject Line: RE: Emodine Scales Murray Family History.

Clarence Elba Wilson Scales

M, b. 10 September 1875, d. 15 July 1965
     Clarence Elba Wilson Scales was born on 10 September 1875 in Sugar Hill, Gwinnett County, Georgia. He married Florida Angelyn Bagwell, daughter of John Elijah Bagwell and Mary Anna Priest. Clarence Elba Wilson Scales died on 15 July 1965 in Brooks County, Georgia, at age 89.

Children of Clarence Elba Wilson Scales and Florida Angelyn Bagwell

Citations

  1. [S2269] Email from Lynn Smith dated August 2012 to Hunter Wayne Bagwell; Subject Line: RE: Emodine Scales Murray Family History.

Nancy Harper1

F, b. 14 November 1809, d. 21 January 1896
     Nancy Harper was born on 14 November 1809 in Auburn, Barrow County, Georgia.2,1 She was the daughter of William Harper. As of 1828,her married name was Bagwell. Nancy Harper married James William Bagwell, son of John Daniel Bagwell and Rachel Chamblee, in 1828 at Anderson County, South Carolina. Nancy Harper lived in 1850 in Eastern Sub Division, Anderson District, South Carolina.1 Nancy filed petition to sell land in 1848 on Saluda River. Nancy, with her 9 children is located in Anderson 1850,
living near her father-in-law, John Daniel. Nancy moved her family to Gwinnett County, Georgia between 1850 and 1860, along with her father-in-law, John Daniel Bagwell. She lived in 1870 in Hog Mountain, Gwinnett County, Georgia. She was living with her daughter (Amanda) and her son-in-law's Hiram N. Rainey (Raney). She died on 21 January 1896 in Gwinnett County, Georgia, at age 86.3 She was buried at Harmony Grove Cemetery, Auburn, Barrow County, Georgia.

Children of Nancy Harper and James William Bagwell

Citations

  1. [S608] United States Federal Census, Washington, District of Columbia, Population Schedule: Eastern Subdivision, Anderson, South Carolina; Page 241; Dwelling Number: 34; Family Number: 34, Date: 1850.
  2. [S475] United States Federal Census, Washington, District of Columbia, Population Schedule: Cains, Gwinnett, Georgia; Enumeration District: 123; Supervisor District: 1; Page: 27, Dwelling: 242, Family Number: 250, Date: 1880.
  3. [S1981] Applicant: Lawrence Raymond Bagwell, "SAR Application of Lawrence Raymond Bagwell for John Daniel Bagwell."